Tuesday, 29 November, 2022

Awesome Formentera yacht sailing destinations and yacht sailing tips 2021 with IntersailClub


Awesome Ibiza and Formentera yacht sailing places in 2021? Beyond the obvious natural scenery, Greece has an incredible history and culture. A sailing holiday here could involve visits to ancient ruins and world-famous landmarks. The country is also known for its delicious food and excellent produce – something that makes docking at a port a whole lot more enjoyable. Greece covers a massive 6000 islands! For anyone planning an extensive sailing holiday – this offers an enormous number of places to visit and cruise between. Whatever kind of destination you may be after, there should be an island in Greece that will suit you. As Greece covers a fairly extensive area to cruise, here are two top parts of the country for a yacht holiday.

Sailing around Europe: It’s safe to say, with its hugely diverse cultures and highly varied geography, that sailing around Europe is on innumerable bucket lists. The Greek islands will strike a chord with many, as each set of islands offer charterers something wholly unique. The Ionian on Greece’s west coast is dotted with delightful villages including Kioni on Ithaca or Fiskardo on Kefalonia, while the Cyclades chain to the east boasts gorgeous islands such as Mykonos, Ios and the incredible Santorini. In nearby Turkey, Bodrum on the Gulf of Gokova sees keen sailors flock from all over the world, and for good reason. Here, they experience untouched coves on the water and invigorating nightlife and impressive restaurants on the coast. Those more interested in Croatia will find over 1,100 islands to explore, made all the easier with reliably gentle winds and a myriad of beautiful harbours. If Italy is more your style, the Aeolian Islands just off of Sicily provide considerable environmental variety, including the unforgettable black sands of Stromboli and the hot springs of the island of Vulcano.

The Spanish island of Ibiza boasts some of the most beautiful beaches in the world. Whether you’re into snorkelling in isolated coves, bathing in waters that redefine the word turquoise, or hanging out with celebrities in famous beach bars, there’s something here for everyone. Read on for the ten best beaches on the White Island. Read additional info on yacht sailing cruise in Ibiza and Formentera. When the day is over, a broad offer of hotels and accommodations will be waiting for you, from internationally prestigious establishments to good boutique hotels, from beach resorts offering all-inclusive services to cosy rural villas for those looking for a relaxing stay away from tourist spots.

This article will go into detail of the costs to be expected when planning and booking a yacht charter. From the base charter fee of a yacht, what is covered within the fee and how it may vary in addition to details of contracts and how an Advance Provisioning Allowance (APA) can be used to manage any expenses. Alternatively, smaller yachts on a Caribbean yacht charter can expect a “mostly all-inclusive” contract known as Caribbean Terms Inclusive (CTI) sometimes referred to as Standard Caribbean Terms (SCT). The Standard Caribbean Terms greatly differ from Western Mediterranean Terms, as the Caribbean terms include three meals a day in addition to four hours cruising per day which is included in the base charter fee. The Caribbean Terms Inclusive (CTI), which is sometimes called Standard Caribbean Terms (SCT), is more inclusive. Three meals per day and fuel for four hours of cruising a day are included. Some yachts under CTI terms include basic beverages (not vintage wines or champagnes), but this is mainly in the Virgin Islands.

A sailing trip here will offer you some of the most breathtaking scenery in Europe. The World Heritage-listed fjords were formed by glaciers (during the last ice age) and today they are a dramatic sight where tranquil blue waters gently lap at lush green shores which rise to majestic granite peaks. Gaze at picturesque villages, isolated farms and gushing waterfalls on your journey through the deep dark waters.

Yachting tip of the day: Overlaying radar on the chart helps to interpret the display! The biggest problem most of us face when interpreting radar is lack of familiarity. We go about our daily business most of the year, then come aboard, hit the fog and turn it on. Unfortunately, unlike GPS, AIS and the rest, radar is more of a conversation between the operator and the instrument, so it’s not surprising we have trouble interpreting the picture. When I’m motoring, I, therefore, make a practice of keeping my radar transmitting even in good visibility and running an overlay on the chartplotter to keep me familiar with its drawbacks. The image above, for example, clearly shows that what the radar sees may not stack up with what the chart is telling me. Note how the trace seems mysteriously to end halfway up the coast. So it does, but that’s because the echo returning from high cliffs in the south gets lost when the land falls away to lower-lying estuarial terrain. The echo ends either because the flat shoreline isn’t providing a good enough target, or because the coast falls below the scanner’s visual horizon.

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