Monday, 02 August, 2021

Mytrendingstories.com offers guides about how to avoid being scammed on the internetright now


How to avoid being scammed on the internet guides by MyTrendingStories online portal? The not-so-sweet tweet (It’s a real long shot): How it works: You get a “tweet” from a Twitter follower, raving about a contest for a free iPad or some other expensive prize: “Just click on the link to learn more.” What’s really going on: The link downloads a “bot” (software robot), adding your computer to a botnet of “zombies” that scammers use to send spam email. The big picture: Scammers are taking advantage of URL-shortening services that allow Twitter users to share links that would otherwise be longer than the 140-character maximum for a tweet. These legitimate services break down a huge URL to ten or 15 characters. But when users can’t see the actual URL, it’s easy for bad guys to post malicious links. Avoidance maneuver: Before clicking on a Twitter link from a follower you don’t know, check out his profile, says Josh George, a website entrepreneur in Vancouver, Washington, who follows online scams. “If he’s following hundreds of thousands of people and nobody is following him, it’s a bot,” he says—a good tip to keep in mind for how to protect yourself online and avoid being scammed.

News by Mytrendingstories.com online platform: How Can I Protect Myself? To avoid fake check scams, follow these tips: Don’t cash the “unexpected” check. Companies, including FINRA, rarely if ever send checks that don’t include some explanation of why the check was issued. Unless you are expecting the check — and you are absolutely certain it is meant for you — do not cash it. Don’t “keep the change. “No legitimate company will overpay you and ask that you wire the difference back to the company or to some third party. Be extremely wary of any offer — in any context — to accept a check or money order in an amount greater than you are owed. Check the sender’s methods of communication. Legitimate businesses rarely communicate exclusively through social media or messaging apps, and hiring managers and executives of those companies generally do not use personal email accounts (e.g., Gmail or Hotmail) for business purposes. Find extra info on https://mytrendingstories.com/bailey-edward/how-to-protect-yourself-against-internet-scams-ejodcx.

MyTrendingStories anti-scam advice: Despite the misconception that fraudsters target senior citizens, a recent study by the FTC found that more millennials than retirees are now getting scammed out of money online. The Better Business Bureau warns about online fraud happening within social media sites like Facebook and Instagram. It starts with a “friend or relative” who contacts you, claiming that you are entitled to free money. But there’s a catch – they want you to pay upfront for shipping or provide your personal information. Follow these tips to avoid a social media scam: Don’t give out your password (and don’t use the same password for multiple accounts) ; Set your account to private and do not accept friend requests from people you don’t know; Always use a secure network, not public Wi-Fi; Keep apps, browsers, and antivirus software up-to-date.

Mytrendingstories.com discuss how to defeat scams: Are you planning your next big trip or family vacation? Beware of scammers. I went to an expert to learn how to spot some of the most common travel scams so you don’t waste your money. Have you ever heard of kissandfly.com? The site touts the “Best flights and fares for you!” Last month, a metro Detroiter reported the site to the Better Business Bureau’s Scam Tracker. The victim was from the 48167 zip code – encompassing Northville, Novi, Farmington Hills, Lyon Township area. The individual wrote, “I bought a ticket to Europe searching through Skyscanner.” They went on to post in the complaint,” After two days, they have canceled one of my flights, no alternative was provided, and I can not get my refund.” The total amount lost, according to the complaint, was $2,150.00! Find more information on https://mytrendingstories.com/.

Your bank will never email you asking for your PIN or password. If you get an email or text from your bank about fraud, ask yourself whether or not that’s the usual way you receive contact from your bank. Think about whether it’s sensible for the bank to make contact in that way. The British Bankers’ Association’s Know Fraud, No Fraud campaign highlights eight things your bank will never do, including calling or emailing to ask you for your full PIN or any passwords. Banks will also never send someone to your home to collect cash, bank cards etc. Get clued up with the full ‘Things your bank will never ask you to do’ list. Web viruses don’t just ruin your computer. They can help steal money or even use PCs to commit crime. Some even lie dormant, waiting to be activated – as was the plan with 2014’s Gameover Zeus virus. To help prevent viruses keep your web browser up to date and your PC backed up with free antivirus software. See our guide on Free Antivirus Software.

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