Monday, 27 September, 2021

Who is John Adlesich and some of his healthcare thoughts


The growth of a healthcare executive professional : John Adlesich on healthcare industry trends in 2021: Cooperative competition, or coopetition, is a key trend in health care. While some providers view big-box stores, nationwide pharmaceutical chains and other new entrants as threats, other organizations see opportunity. Their strategy is to leverage the capabilities of these power players to lower the cost of care, increase downstream market capture and focus on core specialty services while remaining highly connected to the patient. Offload financially draining services. Organizations like CVS and Walmart now offer basic primary care, simple diagnostic services and chronic disease management — services that health systems have struggled to provide and do so profitably. Identifying opportunities to partner with retail organizations to fill this gap can help simplify organizational services, increase access and provide better patient care at a lower cost.

John Adlesich on behavior therapy in 2021: What Is Behavior Therapy? The basic premise of behavioral therapy stems from the Skinnerian theory of operant conditioning, which asserts that behavior is learned, and thus, can be unlearned or modified to comply with socially accepted norms. By evaluating and analyzing behaviors and subsequently offering a reward, also called a consequence, for those behaviors that are socially significant and desirable, maladaptive and/or undesirable behaviors can be reshaped or eliminated. Applied Behavioral Analysis is a highly effective method for mediating behavior across a variety of domains.

John Adlesich on healthcare industry trends: The ACA also includes many popular, patient-focused programs, making it less likely to face repeal. These include the protection for individuals with pre-existing conditions, parental healthcare coverage for children up to age 26, and greater access to health insurance through the exchanges. Popular on the healthcare-industry side are value-based care (VBC) and the Medicare Shared Savings Program. These programs and are likely to continue, regardless of the ACA’s future, because they enjoy bipartisan support. The Biden administration may also take steps to strengthen aspects of the ACA, such as making more resources available for demonstration projects, and raising tax credits and subsidies to purchase insurance on the exchanges. These actions may be attainable within the framework of the existing law and wouldn’t require new legislation. John Adlesich currently works as administrator at Marquis Companies. His latest healthcare industry experience includes positions as executive director at Powerback Rehabilitation Lafayette (Genesis Healthcare) between Aug 2020 – Jan 2021, administrator at Mesa Vista of Boulder between Mar 2019 – Aug 2020, chief executive officer at Sedgwick County Memorial Hospital between Jul 2018 – Feb 2019, interim chief operating officer at Toiyabe Indian Health Project between Mar 2018 – Jun 2018.

John Adlesich believes that 2021 is an important year for the healthcare industry. There will be particular momentum for programs that have bipartisan support, including payment policies that move away from fee-for-service reimbursement and toward models that drive lower-cost and higher-quality outcomes. The overall movement to value will get a shot in the arm from two principal forces in 2021: 1) the Biden Administration’s commitment to build on the ACA’s legacy by doubling down on alternative payment models and mandatory payment changes and 2) the pandemic. When it comes to policy, the new Administration will not need convincing that value-based care improves quality and reduces costs. Ample research shows that since the move to value began, overall health spending as a percent of GDP has slowed, cutting more than $600 billion out of the budget trajectory that was predicted in 2010. Because these programs are net savers, expanding their reach will be an important and immediate objective that could be used to offset some of the COVID-19 relief spending. To that end, we are likely to see Biden’s HHS make fee-for-service less attractive and push at least some mandatory alternative payment models. In addition, the Administration is also likely to move beyond endless testing of models, making proven programs permanent, creating added incentives to enable scale, and leading the way for private payers to follow suit with value-based programs of their own.

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