Tuesday, 29 November, 2022

Top electric vehicles information right now


Expert electric chargers guides? The new Porsche Taycan is a brilliant car to drive, remaining true to its maker’s heritage and leaving you in no doubt that this is a ‘proper’ Porsche sports saloon. The Taycan delivers sports car-like handling, with ferocious acceleration and great agility – yet still offers four seats and a usable range. It’s not often that a car comes along that feels truly revolutionary, but that is exactly what the Porsche Taycan is – and it shows how much fun a plug-in future can be. Despite being a hefty 2.2-tonnes in weight, it hides its bulk well, and is able to weave neatly through tight corners and demolish fast, sweeping bends. The Taycan’s raw pace is, frankly, ridiculous; in ‘standard’ 523bhp 4S guise it manages the 0-62mph benchmark in 4.0s, although if you upgrade to the 750bhp Turbo S version, it’s a staggeringly quick 2.8s. Don’t forget, though, the Taycan should also be pretty easy to live with as a daily driver. Refinement is top notch and, while ride comfort is firm, the air suspension does its job of dealing with the broken, uneven tarmac of UK roads. Find more details at electric motors.

The running costs of an electric car remain considerably lower than traditional fuels, and like the environmental benefits, the positive effects are most apparent when the car is a convenience for short trips, shops and school runs, rather than long-distance transport – exactly the kind of car use that is prevalent in Britain and the worst for the environment. Mainstream electric cars have been on sale in the UK since the introduction of the Nissan Leaf in 2010; earlier models may suit London or other cities, but are rarely something that the average driver would want to use every day. Sales began to really pick up after 2019, where the diversity of models coincides with targeted incentives, particularly around company car taxation. With values of conventional used cars remaining high and likely to drop when new supplies return to normal, there’s never been a better time to consider a second hand electric car.

With new electric cars arriving all the time, now could be the perfect time to switch to an EV. If you’ve still got some questions, we look at how electric cars works, advantages of electric cars and how much it costs to charge an electric car further down the page. First though, here’s our guide to the best electric cars you can buy in the UK today. The Skoda Enyaq iV could be the electric car that many of us have been waiting for. It’s certainly one of the very best electric cars you can buy right now. Based on the same platform as Volkswagen’s ID.4 and the Audi Q4 e-tron, we think it’s the Enyaq that’s the best choice out of the three cars. Why’s that you ask? Surely Volkswagen and Audi trumps Skoda? Don’t get us wrong, the ID.4 and Q4 e-tron are very good electric cars, it’s just that the Enyaq offers greater practicality, more generous kit levels and a more affordable price tag.

Although some customers might still be a little hesitant about making the switch to electric power, one key advantage is that there is a greater selection than ever before. There are small, city car-sized EVs such as the Fiat 500, while Skoda’s capable Enyaq offers SUV practicality, and models from Porsche and Tesla offer plenty of prestige and pace. Also wading into the mix is the brilliant, yet controversial Ford Mustang-badged Mach-E SUV and of course, the Hyundai Ioniq 5 took our Car of the Year award for 2021. There are other benefits to pure-electric motoring besides the environmental credentials – you’ll be exempt from London’s congestion charge zone and from paying road tax. Electric cars still remain more expensive than their combustion engined counterparts to buy, even with the government’s plug-in car grant, but running costs have been shown to be as much as 60% less for electric cars than they are for pertol and diesel ones. Discover more info at https://evmotors.live/.

Before the Mercedes EQB arrived on the scene, the only seven-seater EV options around were some van-derived minibuses and the ultra-premium Tesla Model X. All versions of the EQB sold in the UK will come with three rows of seating as standard, with the rearmost seats providing enough room for children, and get ISOFIX points, too. Both the EQB 300 and EQB 350 which are available from launch also get a 66.5kWh battery for a range of over 250 miles, plus all-wheel-drive, with enough power in even the entry-level version to satisfy most people day-to-day and allowing for a smooth and relaxing driving experience. The EQB also gets the same great MBUX infotainment setup as the more expensive EQC.

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