Saturday, 13 April, 2024

Inequality-opoly : discover a structural racism board game


High quality racial inequities board game by inequality-opoly.com? The mission of Inequality-opoly is to spread awareness and advance discourse about the effects of Structural Racism and Sexism in America. The objective of Inequality-opoly is to battle with or benefit from Structural Racism and/or Sexism to become the wealthiest player and partnership by buying, renting, developing property, and (most importantly) making deals. Whichever player or partnership has the most wealth at the end of the game wins. See additional information at racial inequities board game.

Diversity And Inclusion tip of the day : If your workplace is rich with diversity, why celebrate just Christmas? Keeping track of only the standard holidays can disturb the sense of belonging for many others. An extensive and interactive diversity calendar can reap the best benefits of diversity. Books play a primary role in making the workplace more welcoming and inclusive. Reading diverse narratives helps in empathizing with the experiences of others from different groundings.

In creating Inequality-opoly, Clemons is following in Magie’s footsteps, using a similar concept to educate the public about the inequalities that characterize our society. “My hope for Inequality-opoly is to fulfill its mission to spread awareness and advance discourse about how structural racism and sexism affect the accumulation and sustaining of wealth in America” Clemons told me in a recent conversation.

As an example, each time you pass the “Start” space, the amount of money you collect depends on your race and gender, based on U.S. wage gap data. And whenever a player lands on a “Life Event” space, they draw a card whose impact is also tied to each player’s race and gender, all of it based on statistics from the U.S. population. Life Event cards include situations such as interactions with the police, generational wealth transfer, or employment; when a card is drawn, each player consults their Identity Card to determine their specific experience.

Between 2009 and 2020, Black college-educated women experienced a 3.7 percent wage decrease, and Black women categorized as working class experienced a wage increase of 4.2 percent. Black women also face high level of unemployment compared with white people. Seventeen percent of Black women with less than a high school degree were unemployed in 2017, compared with 10 percent of white women and 9 percent of white men. Find extra info on structural racism Monopoly board game.

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